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There’s Something in the Water in Glendale

Marlins LHP Prospect Andrew Heaney stays up all day to get lucky. (Photo Courtesy of MLB Draft Countdown)

Marlins LHP Prospect Andrew Heaney stays up all day to get lucky.
(Photo Courtesy of MLB Draft Countdown)

No-hit performances by pitchers are a bit like throwing a bulls-eye in a game of darts. The difference between a skilled dart-thrower and a non-skilled dart-thrower is great; it is unarguably a skill that is improved by the muscle memory gained via practice. Much like anything in life, skill at darts progresses along a curve; making the same effort to improve will provide diminishing returns as you move up in skill. One cannot practice enough to be able to throw a dart into the bulls-eye every time; it is conceivably possible to comprehend, but the amount of practice that would seemingly be required is prohibitive. This same effect can be seen in most any field where skill plays in; an average Joe has a miniscule chance of beating a master dart-thrower in a standard game of darts, but relative to the gap between their skill levels they have a much closer-together chance of throwing three bulls-eyes in a row. There’s an old expression about how you have to be good to get the chance to be lucky, and baseball offers more glimpses at the elite getting lucky than possibly any other modern entertainment.

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Alex Meyer – Large Right Hander, Large Stuff, Large Ks

They keep telling RHP Alex Meyer that he's a Minnesota Twin, but he just keeps striking guys out anyway.  (Photo Courtesy of ESPN)

They keep telling RHP Alex Meyer that he’s a Minnesota Twin, but he just keeps striking guys out anyway.
(Photo Courtesy of ESPN)

There is no sure-fire recipe for success in the big leagues; success in the big leagues is not a cake, nor does it resemble a cake in more than a couple cursory ways. Instead, success in the major leagues seems to be attainable by a number of different methods. If one is a starting pitcher, one could conceivably succeed in myriad ways. One could, for instance, use superior command to generate weak contact in spite of a lack of overpowering stuff; creating an abundance of ground balls that are hopefully far less damaging to the score of your team. If one were a pitcher in the Minnesota Twins organization, you could be forgiven for having believed that this was actually the only avenue by which one would be allowed to succeed. Alex Meyer, the top pitching prospect in said Minnesota Twins organization, continued his quest to dispel you of these inaccurate notions as, on Friday, he racked up 7 Ks across 6.1 innings and gave up just a walk and a single hit (a double down the right field line off the bat of Yankees farmhand Addison Maruszak).

Hot Video Highlights after the jump!

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